Man In Camo

Man in Camo is an explosive commentary on the life and times of filmmaker and artist Ethan Minsker, a Washington D.C. native. Growing up on the turbulent streets in D.C. in the 1980s was violent and uneasy, but Minsker found solace in his home, making films and growing his own artistic credibility.

 

Navigating a diagnosis of dyslexia, the abrasiveness of the punk scene, and political parents, Minsker takes us on a journey through the mind of a man who has leapt over hurdles in order to make art that matters. He displays his thought process from making creative films to fanzines and aggressively reiterates why a creative life is important to society and to life itself. The film is complete with commentary from Minsker, as well as those close to him, including his mother and personal friends. Now a father, Minsker looks back on the times that shaped the man he is today.

 

Man in Camo explores the intricacies of what it means to be a modern artist, and why art is still so important to the world at large. Minsker’s overarching message is more than just skin deep: art is all around us, but we must be militant to become a part of it. And so, clad in camo, the artist hides in plain sight, silently growing and making your world that much more colorful.

 

 

Director Biography - Ethan Minsker

 

Ethan Minsker's descriptors include writer, filmmaker, artist, and publisher, creator, and editor-in-chief of Psycho Moto Zine, which has been in publication since 1988. Minsker is a founding member of the Antagonist Movement, an East Village/LES-based group of artists, writers, and musicians that promotes lesser-known works by up-and-coming talent. This group was recently featured in his newest film, Self Medicated, a documentary on the struggles artists face to stay happy. Self Medicated: a film about art won the DIY award at the 2014 RxSM Film Festival. Ethan was also the recipient of the ACKER Award for Visual Arts 2016.

Director Statement

I have been making films since I was seven years old, when my grandfather gave me his old Super 8 camera. In high school I would sneak off to the cinema any time I had scraped together enough money to get in. When VHS became available in the video rental shops I would spend my time watching five or more films in a row. I worked entire summers painting the inside and outside of our house to get enough money to buy one of the first compact Betamax camcorders. I began making my own films, editing in-camera with only the on/off button. Later on, I worked as a grip and electric on independent film productions during college.

 

Today I make films that, by design, are different than what is widely available. If you are going to make a film about artists, why watch one about the already rich and famous? I want to know about great talent that has yet to be discovered. I made a promise to myself years ago: I will make the best films I can with whatever budget I have. I will do my best to make something that has never been seen before, and use the talent I find around me. If you are going to spend time with one of my films it should be a unique experience.